Tag Archives: posture

Go-To Yoga for Your Desk Job

8 Apr

Yoga is a wonderful practice you can incorporate into any part of your life.  If you are like 4 out of 5 Americans who have a desk job, it is even more important to bring some healthy, vital movement & breath into your workday.

Here are 5 poses you can integrate into your workplace that fit into a cubicle.

Desk-Yoga.jpg

Printable versionDesk Yoga

Feel free to share with your coworkers!

Asana: Bharadvajasana

6 Jan

Bharadvajasana (sage’s twist / simple seated twist) is a seated twist.

This pose should never cause pain, especially in the knees or neck.  Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, use appropriate props to build your pose in a way that supports your body, and come out of the pose whenever you need to.

Bharadvajasana

  • Stretches the spine, shoulders, and hips
  • Massages the abdominal organs
  • Relieves lower back & neck pain and sciatica
  • Relieves stress
  • Improves digestion
  • Especially good in the second trimester of pregnancy for strengthening the lower back

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Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Baddha Konasana

6 Jan

Baddha Konasana (Cobbler’s Pose / Bound Angle Pose) is a seated, hip-opening asana.

This pose should never cause pain, especially in the knees or back.  Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, use appropriate props to build your pose in a way that supports your body, and come out of the pose whenever you need to.

Baddha Konasana

  • Externally rotates the thighs, stretching and strengthening groins and knees (great preparation for seated meditation postures)
  • Alleviates fatigue
  • Maintains health of kidneys and prostate gland
  • Helps treat urinary tract disorders
  • Reduces sciatic pain, opens lower back
  • Prevents hernia
  • Keeps reproductive organs healthy
  • Overall very beneficial for menstruation: corrects irregular menstruation, checks heavy periods, relieves pain
  • Helps with digestion

Here is an additional resource that delves into the anatomy of the hip adductors by Julie Gudmestad, PT, of Gudmestad Yoga: Thigh Master II

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Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Uttanasana

6 Jan

Uttanasana (Standing forward fold / intense forward stretch pose) is a foundational standing asana.

This pose should never cause pain, especially in the back.  Bend your knees soon as your spine begins to round, and draw the navel back toward the spine to protect the back.  Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, use appropriate props and “stopping points” so that you practice this pose in a way that supports your body, and bend your knees to come out of the pose whenever you need to.

Uttanasana

  • Relieves mental and physical exhaustion
  • Slows heart beat
  • Tones liver, spleen, kidneys
  • Relieves stomach ache
  • Reduces abdominal and back pain during menstruation
  • Strengthens quadriceps while lengthening hamstrings

Here is a great article that demystifies what happens with the quadriceps, hamstrings, and erector spinae in Uttanasana by Julie Gudmestad, PT, of Gudmestad Yoga: Thigh Master

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Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Utthita Parsvakonasana

6 Jan

Utthita Parsvakonasana (extended side angle pose) is a strong, foundational standing pose.

Be mindful of the position of the front knee–never beyond the ankle, and stacked in alignment.  For help with balance, practice next to the wall for stability.  Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, and come out of the pose by straightening the knees whenever you need to.  Notice sensation in your body, and please come out of the pose if you feel pain.

Utthita Parsvakonasana is helpful for:

  • Constipation
  • Infertility
  • Low backache
  • Osteoporosis
  • Sciatica
  • Menstrual discomfort
  • Strengthening and stretching the legs, knees, and ankles
  • Stretching the groins, spine, waist, chest and lungs, and shoulders
  • Stimulating the abdominal organs
  • Increasing stamina

_________________________________________________________________________________

Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Virabhadrasana II

4 Jan

Virabhadrasana II (warrior two pose) is a strong, foundational standing pose that increases overall strength and stamina.

Be mindful of the position of the front knee–never beyond the ankle, and stacked in alignment.  For help with balance, practice next to a chair so you can place a hand on the chair for stability.  Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, and come out of the pose by straightening the knees whenever you need to.  Notice sensation in your body, and please come out of the pose if you feel pain.

Virabhadrasana II:

  • Strengthens & stretches the legs and ankles
  • Stretches the groins, chest and lungs, shoulders
  • Increases breathing capacity
  • Stimulates abdominal organs
  • Increases stamina
  • Relieves backaches, particularly in lower spine, and helps with prolapsed or herniated disc

_________________________________________________________________________________

Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Parsvottanasana

4 Jan

Parsvottanasana (standing head to knee pose / intense side stretch pose) is a strong, hip-balancing foundational standing pose.

Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, and come out of the pose by returning to standing whenever you need to.  Notice sensation in your body, and please come out of the pose if you feel pain.

Parsvottanasana:

  • Calms the brain, soothes the nerves
  • Relieves neck, shoulder, elbow and wrist arthritis when done with palms in reverse namascar
  • Stretches the spine, hips, and hamstrings
  • Strengthens the legs
  • Stimulates the abdominal organs, tones liver and spleen
  • Reduces menstrual pain
  • Improves posture and sense of balance
  • Improves digestion

Check out this article from Claudia Cummins on how to refine and progress your Parsvottanasana.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Trikonasana

3 Jan

Trikonasana (triangle pose) is a foundational standing pose in asana.

Be mindful of knee alignment, not torquing the front knee but keeping it pointing in the same direction as the second toe.  If you tend to hyperextend the knee joint, keep a micro bend in the knee by engaging the hamstring strongly as it lengthens.  Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, and come out of the pose by returning to standing whenever you need to.  Notice sensation in your body, and please come out of the pose if you feel pain.

Trikonasana:

  • Stretches and strengthens the thighs, knees, and ankles
  • Stretches the hips, groins, hamstrings, and calves; shoulders, chest, and spine
  • Balances the hips and low back
  • Stimulates the abdominal organs
  • Helps relieve stress
  • Improves digestion (relieves gastritis, indigestion, acidity, and flatulence)
  • Helps relieve the symptoms of menopause and menstrual discomfort, as it massages and tones the pelvic area
  • Alleviates backache, improves flexibility of spine
  • Therapeutic for anxiety, flat feet, infertility, neck pain, osteoporosis, and sciatica

_________________________________________________________________________________

Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Anjaneyasana

3 Jan

Anjaneyasana (low lunge / crescent lunge pose) is a great warm-up pose for the Warrior postures.

Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, and come out of the pose by returning to hands and knees or coming to standing whenever you need to.  Notice sensation in your body, and please come out of the pose if you feel pain.  This pose should not be painful.

Anjaneyasana:

  • Stretches hip flexors
  • Balances the hips
  • Strengthens the abdominal core
  • Stretches & strengthens the shoulder girdle
  • Relieves sciatica

The crescent comes from the shape of the body when arms are extended overhead and back slightly, and gaze lifts up toward the sky.  Begin practicing this pose with the gaze forward and the arms straight up to find a strong core, and then you may choose to progress the pose gradually as strength, alignment and endurance builds.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Virabhadrasana I

2 Jan

Virabhadrasana I (warrior one pose) is a strong, foundational standing pose.

From YogaJournal: “What’s really being commemorated in this pose’s name, and held up as an ideal for all practitioners, is the spiritual warrior, who bravely does battle with the universal enemy, self-ignorance (avidya), the ultimate source of all our suffering.”  Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, and come out of the pose by straightening the knees whenever you need to.  Notice sensation in your body, and please come out of the pose if you feel pain.

Virabhadrasana I:

  • Stretches the chest and lungs, shoulders and neck, belly, groins (psoas)
  • Strengthens the shoulders, arms, abdominal and back muscles
  • Strengthens and stretches the thighs, calves, and ankles
  • Reduces backache, lumbago and sciatica
  • Relieves acidity and improves digestion
  • Strengthens bladder and corrects displaced uterus

_________________________________________________________________________________

Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Bhujangasana

2 Jan

Bhujangasana (cobra pose) is a stabilizing back bend that helps to build core strength and balance the front and back body.

Note: Keep the low back from crunching by rooting the pubic bone into the floor and finding the arch in the upper spine.  This pose is a great tonic for those of us who spend much of the day seated, at a desk, driving, or hunched over.  Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, and lower down onto your belly-chest when you need to.  Notice sensation in your body, and please come out of the pose if you feel pain.

Bhujangasana can:

  • Strengthen the spine, core
  • Stretch chest, lungs, abdomen, shoulders
  • Firm the buttocks
  • Stimulat abdominal organs
  • Relieve stress and fatigue
  • Open the heart and lungs
  • Sooth sciatica
  • Help with asthma
  • Increase body heat

_________________________________________________________________________________

Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.

Asana: Virasana & Supta Virasana

1 Jan

Virasana & Supta Virasana (Hero Pose & Supine Hero Pose) is a great asana to find for pranayama or meditation in your yoga practice.

This pose should never cause pain in the knees.  Breathe slowly and fully as you practice, use appropriate props to build your pose in a way that supports your body, and come out of the pose, coming onto all fours and straightening your knees whenever you need to.  The stretch should be felt in the belly or middle of your muscles–not at the joints.  Notice sensation in your body–particularly in your knees–and please come out of the pose if you feel pain.

Virasana is beneficial for

  • Stretching the quadriceps
  • Keeping knee joints healthy (only if done with proper alignment!)
  • Aligning tendons in the back of the knees
  • Strengthening feet and ankles
  • Improving digestion
  • Relieving gas
  • Broadening the sacrum
  • Relieving gout
  • Reducing tailbone pain
  • Correcting herniated discs
  • Improving foot circulation

More resources:

Roger Cole, PhD, writes a series about how to navigate Virasana in a way that is healthy to your body: Keep the Knees Healthy in Virasana and Practice Tips for Virasana.

_________________________________________________________________________________

Approach these asanas slowly and mindfully. If something hurts, back out of the pose gently and reassess. Do not ever push through pain. The techniques and suggestions presented in these videos are not intended to substitute for medical advice. Consult your physician before beginning any new exercise program. Jessie Tierney and YogAscent/Horseback Yoga videos and website assume no responsibility for injuries suffered while practicing these techniques. If you are new to exercise or yoga, are elderly, have any chronic or recurring conditions such as high blood pressure, neck or back pain, arthritis, heart disease, and so on, seek your physician’s advice before practicing to determine necessary precautions.